loader image
Disease and conditions A-Z

S.Africa records over 1,000 virus deaths, more than 50,000 cases

coronavirus
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

South Africa’s coronavirus deaths passed 1,000 on Monday and infections spiked to over 50,000 just a week after the continent’s worst-hit country further eased lockdown restrictions, official statistics showed.

The number of detected infections was 50,879—the worst in Africa.

However, South Africa ranks second in terms of deaths at 1,080 after Egypt.

The continent’s most advanced economy has since May been gradually easing tight restrictions imposed in March.

It is now allowing some school children to return to classes and the majority of businesses to operate.

More than a half of all cases have been recorded in the last two weeks, President Cyril Ramaphosa said on Monday.

“As we watch the number of infections rise further—probably far faster than most of us imagined—we should be concerned, but not alarmed,” he said.

“That is because we have the ability… to limit the impact of the disease on our people,” he said.

Most of South Africa’s infections—around two-thirds—are found in the Western Cape province, a popular tourist destination home to the coastal city of Cape Town.

The World Health Organization said Monday that the coronavirus pandemic situation was worsening around the globe, although the situation was improving in Europe.


Follow the latest news on the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak


© 2020 AFP

Citation:
S.Africa records over 1,000 virus deaths, more than 50,000 cases (2020, June 8)
retrieved 8 June 2020
from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2020-06-safrica-virus-deaths-cases.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no
part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.




Source link

Show More

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button